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jakeblues

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  • Birthday 01/01/1930
  1. slide sunday dec 30th KRS 1

    Original B-boy dies at 44 Thursday, April 3, 2008 Last updated: Thursday April 3, 2008, EDT 4:04 PM BY JERRY DEMARCO STAFF WRITER Email this story Printer friendly version Decrease Font Size Increase Font Size The man whose acrobatic performance with the legendary Rock Steady Crew in the 1983 hit movie "Flashdance" set off a worldwide breakdancing craze, died Thursday. He was 44. Wayne Frost, a hip-hop pioneer known as Frosty Freeze, died at Mount Sinai Medical Center after a long illness, said Jorge "Fabel" Pabon, senior vice-president of the musical group where Frost made his name as a B-boy -- or breakdancer. Frost was an original, appearing not only in movies but also in videos, including Afrika Bambaataa and The Soulsonic Force's "Planet Rock" and Malcolm McLaren's "Buffalo Gals." His style included acrobatic and fearless dance moves that he originated as a young teen in the mid- to late-70s. Frost toured the world with the Rock Steady Crew and other hip-hop artists, including Fab 5 Freddy, Futura 2000 and Kool Lady Blue. As a member of RSC, Frost became known for his comedic, fearless and inventive style. He developed his trademark move, "The Suicide" -- also known as "The Death Freeze Drop" -- when he attempted a poorly executed backflip and landed on his back. He didn't like the term "breakdancing," opting instead for "breaking." "Most of the stuff you've seen me do is stuff that I made up and stuff that I learned from my mentors," including Ken Swift and the Zulu Crew, as well as James Brown, Sammy Davis Jr. and Michael Jackson, Frost said in an interview last year. Other movie appearances included "Wild Style," "Style Wars" and "The Freshest Kids." Frost was also the first b-boy to appear on a magazine cover, The Village Voice, in 1981. In 2004, he along with several other members of RSC were honored at the VH-1 Hip Hop Honors. Until recently, he was living in New York City, regularly making appearances at many hip-hop/Bboy/Bgirl events in the NYC area and around the country. He believed strongly in the future of hip-hop and breaking. "The list goes on," he said, of newer, aggressive breakers who "continue to come up with a lot of ideas. "I never thought I'd see it go this far." The man whose acrobatic performance with the legendary Rock Steady Crew in the 1983 hit movie "Flashdance" set off a worldwide breakdancing craze, died Thursday. He was 44. Pioneer breakdancer Frosty Freeze (seen here with fellow RSC member, YNOT on March 7, 2006) has died. Wayne Frost, a hip-hop pioneer known as Frosty Freeze, died at Mount Sinai Medical Center after a long illness, said Jorge "Fabel" Pabon, senior vice-president of the musical group where Frost made his name as a B-boy -- or breakdancer. Frost was an original, appearing not only in movies but also in videos, including Afrika Bambaataa and The Soulsonic Force's "Planet Rock" and Malcolm McLaren's "Buffalo Gals." His style included acrobatic and fearless dance moves that he originated as a young teen in the mid- to late-70s. Frost toured the world with the Rock Steady Crew and other hip-hop artists, including Fab 5 Freddy, Futura 2000 and Kool Lady Blue. As a member of RSC, Frost became known for his comedic, fearless and inventive style. He developed his trademark move, "The Suicide" -- also known as "The Death Freeze Drop" -- when he attempted a poorly executed backflip and landed on his back. Original B-boy See Frosty Freeze perform in "Buffalo Gals" (Malcolm McLaren). He didn't like the term "breakdancing," opting instead for "breaking." "Most of the stuff you've seen me do is stuff that I made up and stuff that I learned from my mentors," including Ken Swift and the Zulu Crew, as well as James Brown, Sammy Davis Jr. and Michael Jackson, Frost said in an interview last year. Other movie appearances included "Wild Style," "Style Wars" and "The Freshest Kids." Frost was also the first b-boy to appear on a magazine cover, The Village Voice, in 1981. In 2004, he along with several other members of RSC were honored at the VH-1 Hip Hop Honors. Until recently, he was living in New York City, regularly making appearances at many hip-hop/Bboy/Bgirl events in the NYC area and around the country. He believed strongly in the future of hip-hop and breaking. "The list goes on," he said, of newer, aggressive breakers who "continue to come up with a lot of ideas. "I never thought I'd see it go this far."
  2. Random Thoughts #3

    marcblemberg? Original B-boy dies at 44 Thursday, April 3, 2008 Last updated: Thursday April 3, 2008, EDT 4:04 PM BY JERRY DEMARCO STAFF WRITER The man whose acrobatic performance with the legendary Rock Steady Crew in the 1983 hit movie "Flashdance" set off a worldwide breakdancing craze, died Thursday. He was 44. Wayne Frost, a hip-hop pioneer known as Frosty Freeze, died at Mount Sinai Medical Center after a long illness, said Jorge "Fabel" Pabon, senior vice-president of the musical group where Frost made his name as a B-boy -- or breakdancer. Frost was an original, appearing not only in movies but also in videos, including Afrika Bambaataa and The Soulsonic Force's "Planet Rock" and Malcolm McLaren's "Buffalo Gals." His style included acrobatic and fearless dance moves that he originated as a young teen in the mid- to late-70s. Frost toured the world with the Rock Steady Crew and other hip-hop artists, including Fab 5 Freddy, Futura 2000 and Kool Lady Blue. As a member of RSC, Frost became known for his comedic, fearless and inventive style. He developed his trademark move, "The Suicide" -- also known as "The Death Freeze Drop" -- when he attempted a poorly executed backflip and landed on his back. He didn't like the term "breakdancing," opting instead for "breaking." "Most of the stuff you've seen me do is stuff that I made up and stuff that I learned from my mentors," including Ken Swift and the Zulu Crew, as well as James Brown, Sammy Davis Jr. and Michael Jackson, Frost said in an interview last year. Other movie appearances included "Wild Style," "Style Wars" and "The Freshest Kids." Frost was also the first b-boy to appear on a magazine cover, The Village Voice, in 1981. In 2004, he along with several other members of RSC were honored at the VH-1 Hip Hop Honors. Until recently, he was living in New York City, regularly making appearances at many hip-hop/Bboy/Bgirl events in the NYC area and around the country. He believed strongly in the future of hip-hop and breaking. "The list goes on," he said, of newer, aggressive breakers who "continue to come up with a lot of ideas. "I never thought I'd see it go this far." The man whose acrobatic performance with the legendary Rock Steady Crew in the 1983 hit movie "Flashdance" set off a worldwide breakdancing craze, died Thursday. He was 44. Pioneer breakdancer Frosty Freeze (seen here with fellow RSC member, YNOT on March 7, 2006) has died. Wayne Frost, a hip-hop pioneer known as Frosty Freeze, died at Mount Sinai Medical Center after a long illness, said Jorge "Fabel" Pabon, senior vice-president of the musical group where Frost made his name as a B-boy -- or breakdancer. Frost was an original, appearing not only in movies but also in videos, including Afrika Bambaataa and The Soulsonic Force's "Planet Rock" and Malcolm McLaren's "Buffalo Gals." His style included acrobatic and fearless dance moves that he originated as a young teen in the mid- to late-70s. Frost toured the world with the Rock Steady Crew and other hip-hop artists, including Fab 5 Freddy, Futura 2000 and Kool Lady Blue. As a member of RSC, Frost became known for his comedic, fearless and inventive style. He developed his trademark move, "The Suicide" -- also known as "The Death Freeze Drop" -- when he attempted a poorly executed backflip and landed on his back. Original B-boy See Frosty Freeze perform in "Buffalo Gals" (Malcolm McLaren). He didn't like the term "breakdancing," opting instead for "breaking." "Most of the stuff you've seen me do is stuff that I made up and stuff that I learned from my mentors," including Ken Swift and the Zulu Crew, as well as James Brown, Sammy Davis Jr. and Michael Jackson, Frost said in an interview last year. Other movie appearances included "Wild Style," "Style Wars" and "The Freshest Kids." Frost was also the first b-boy to appear on a magazine cover, The Village Voice, in 1981. In 2004, he along with several other members of RSC were honored at the VH-1 Hip Hop Honors. Until recently, he was living in New York City, regularly making appearances at many hip-hop/Bboy/Bgirl events in the NYC area and around the country. He believed strongly in the future of hip-hop and breaking. "The list goes on," he said, of newer, aggressive breakers who "continue to come up with a lot of ideas. "I never thought I'd see it go this far."
  3. Lets Bring CP Baaaack....Who's with me??

    Bring CP back? CP is boring.
  4. D:Fuse launches new website

    DJ D:FUSE has launched a new website. Very well done! DJ D:FUSE
  5. D:Fuse Launches new website

    ............................
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