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danamdkny

Time standing STiLL

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JEEzzz--- sometimes I feel like time is standing still and I am going nowhere

and sometimes I feel like time is passing me by>>>>

I need a change.

right now I feel like I am in rut and am powerless to move forth,

:mad: ggrrrrr

. . .monday sucks

k moving right along~>>>>>>

:)

Time marches on never ending -- ---

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This is tough, because sometimes time is going slow to our liking, sometimes against our liking; and sometimes time passes by fast while we go fast, so it sort of aids us.

I guess what im getting at is that if you notice time passing you by, get up and change your routine. Keeping all your time slots filled keeps you away from that feeling of anxiety about all things "passing quickly"

And if time seems to be moving at a standstill, that may also be a chance to take action. I feel that we feel these ultra-extremes when the body/mind asks us to do something in our lives differently. TO take action, whether it be to go for a walk, look for another job, move to another town, or simply to go to bed earlier!

:updown:

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WeLL----~ it was just another manic Monday~ :)

although I still need to defy inertia and get the ball in motion>>>

TOnight is opening night for me! :) WHHOooOOOOoOO! :D

wish me luck with the critics :) :) :) :)

btw-- george---*there;s a small article on Carroll Dunham in this month's VoGUE--:cool:

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http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2002211250406

(((((the stufff bout me should be in bold)))))))

'Will Rogers Follies' mostly a delight

By JAY HANDELMAN

[email protected]

posted 11/25/02

VENICE -- Before his death in a plane crash in Alaska in 1935, Will Rogers was one of the world's biggest stars, on a par with Charlie Chaplin, Elvis Presley and The Beatles.

This genial, rope-spinning political humorist was a superstar on stage, radio, in daily newspapers and even in the movies.

And if he's anything like the folksy character depicted in "The Will Rogers Follies," it's easy to understand why.

The musical at the Venice Little Theatre, directed with energy by Joe Simmons, tells his story in the style of an old-fashioned Ziegfeld Follies show, with lots of showgirls, and of course, Rogers at center stage.

Peter Stone's book mixes biography and some famous Rogers quips, while making some humorous adjustments for Ziegfeld's stylistic demands.

While the Venice production doesn't have the opulence of a true Ziegfeld show, it does have a charming leading player in Al Jackson. He may not fully convey the aw-shucks nature of that unassuming superstar, but he sings his songs in a pleasant voice and just seems to ooze a friendly nature.

As his wife, Betty Blake, Sharon Costedio brings a similar presence and a strong singing voice, which fits a bouncy number like "The Big Time" and a bluesy torch song like "No Man Left For Me."

Frank Troncale has spirit as Will's constantly disappointed father, Clem. Dana Marie is just right as the flirtatious showgirl who is known only as Ziegfeld's Favorite, so you know how she got her job. She sashays and struts across the stage to introduce each scene and leads the large chorus in the opening number "Will-a-Mania," which explains the impact of Rogers' work.

:D :D :D

Simmons keeps the show moving, up and down the impressive, lighted staircase that dominates the stage designed by Tim O'Donnell and Carrie Riley-O'Donnell. Carrie Riley-O'Donnell's costumes have a colorful flair for the production numbers, which also gain life from the lively dances staged by Deb Lombard. She echoes the original hand-patting Tommy Tune choreography for "Our Favorite Son," and lends her own flair to the other numbers.

Rick Bogner's band captures the sound of the early 20th century with the bright score by Cy Coleman, and while the band isn't playing too loud, the musicians tend to drown out the singers, who apparently use microphones with volumes set too low.

That's a shame, because the audience misses many of the jokes contained in the clever lyrics by Betty Comden and the late Adolph Green.

The show opened only two weeks after Green's death, and the production can serve as a tribute to this great lyricist as well as to the man being saluted.

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WoW! THat's Friggity Great!!! :D

1st of all, i read the herald tribune whenever i travel abroad. It's a great newspaper combining the New York Times, Washington times and Wall Street into one.

Second, did this take place in Venice, Italy? Or was it just set there?

This is really something~

3 Cheers for DaNa :)

:clap::clap2::clap:

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Originally posted by danamdkny

JEEzzz--- sometimes I feel like time is standing still and I am going nowhere

and sometimes I feel like time is passing me by>>>>

I need a change.

right now I feel like I am in rut and am powerless to move forth,

:mad: ggrrrrr

. . .monday sucks

k moving right along~>>>>>>

:)

Time marches on never ending -- ---

I feel as if ive done too much to go back, and too lil to go forward...

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here's another very generous review: :D:cool:

The Will Rogers Follies wows VLT audience

Al Jackson has been paying his dues on local stages for the past several years, waiting for his turn in the limelight.

Tuesday night, Nov. 19, he earned his star.

Appearing as Will Rogers in the Venice Little Theatre production of "The Will Rogers Follies," he danced and sang his heart out and even did a darn good job of spinning a lariat.

The only thing Jackson did wrong was to stay in the back of the cast line after the opening night show. It is tradition for all the actors to appear in the VLT lobby to shake hands with the audience. Jackson earned his spot at the front of the line where everyone could congratulate him. Instead, he was almost at the end of the line, nearly in the Green Room, missing out on most of the accolades that he deserved.

Directed by Joe Simmons, with costumes by Carrie Riley-O'Donnell, sets by O'Donnell and her husband Tim O'Donnell who also did the lighting design, "Follies" is a good example of quality community theater.

There is nothing more heartwarming than to attend a community theater, especially our own Venice Little Theatre, and to see talent and fun all wrapped up in one tidy package. That the VLT troupe did such a good job with a show that has few, if any, songs that leave the theater with the audience, makes it all the more impressive.

Sharon Costedio, as Rogers' wife, Betty Blake, was wonderful. She has a pleasant voice and her delivery was everything it needed to be for her to turn in a convincing performance.

Also brilliant was Dana Marie who lights up the stage whenever she appears as Flo Ziegfield's Favorite. As the favorite, she makes a lot of appearances, prancing like the best show business cutey and flashing the most infectious smile. By the second appearance, she had the audience eating out of her hand for her part, a running sight gag that continued throughout the show.

Also appearing several times was Kent Schroeder as Wiley Post, but his appearances were a counterbalance to the otherwise joyous nature of the show because whenever Post appeared it served as a reminder of Rogers death in a plane accident at the age of 55. Post was the pilot when the accident occurred as the two were en route to Alaska.

Appearing as the Rogers' children were Anthony Lombard, Jamie McGonagill, Daniel Berkowitz and Alex Vercheski -- a talented and adorable group of kids who were perfect in their roles.

Mark Gallaher was the voice of Flo Ziegfield.

David Panton, Dan Sullivan, Scott Vitale, Allen Kretschmar and David Lawrence portrayed cowboys. Pat Abate, Nicole Calabrese, Kara Moseley, Maria Santagada, Rachel Taylor and Kathy Zumbano portrayed the Ziegfield girls. Melanie Blanche, Anne Clinche, Bethany Ehrhart, Molly Healy, Rhonda McCarte and Es Sihart portrayed Ziegfield girls and the Six Single Sisters.

All these singers and dancers turned in fine performances. A highlight was their sit-down, hand-jive number, performed with Marie and Jackson. Deb Lombard was the choreographer and Rick Bogner the musical director.

This is the 272nd MainStage production. The VLT is located at 140 W. Tampa Ave.

Tickets are $18. They can be purchased at the VLT box office, Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. or by phone at 488-1115.

By Kim Cool

http://www.sun-herald.com/search/search.asp

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