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U.S. Refuses to Hand Over Marine in Japan Rape Case

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soon to be hated in asia....the US at it again!!.....

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U.S. Refuses to Hand Over Marine in Japan Rape Case

Thu December 5, 2002 10:13 AM ET

By Teruaki Ueno

TOKYO (Reuters) - The United States said on Thursday it would not agree to Tokyo's request to hand over to Japanese authorities a U.S. Marine suspected of trying to rape a woman on Okinawa, home to most of the U.S. military bases in Japan.

The U.S. refusal comes at a time when public resentment toward U.S. forces is growing in Japan and South Korea, with calls to revise treaties governing the conduct of the U.S. troops in the two key U.S. allies.

Japan had demanded the U.S. military hand over Major Michael J. Brown, 39, who police allege tried to rape the woman in her car on November 2.

Japanese police have declined to give details about the woman, but Kyodo news agency said she was from the Philippines.

"We have informed the government of Japan in a December 5 meeting of the U.S.-Japan joint committee that the government of the United States is unable to agree to transfer custody in this case prior to indictment," the U.S. embassy in Tokyo said.

RESENTMENT RUNS DEEP

"The government of the United States has concluded that the circumstances of this case as presented by the government of Japan do not warrant departure from the standard practice as agreed between the United States and Japan," it added.

Under the Status of Forces Agreement governing the conduct of the U.S. military in Japan, the United States need not hand over suspects until they are charged by Japanese prosecutors, except in the case of "heinous crimes" such as rape and murder.

Residents of Okinawa have long resented what they see as their unfair burden in hosting 26,000 of the 48,000 U.S. military personnel in the country as part of the U.S.-Japan security alliance, a pillar of Tokyo's postwar foreign policy.

Incidents involving the U.S. military, including the notorious 1995 rape of aKorea, with calls to revise treaties governing the conduct of the U.S. troops in the two key U.S. allies.

Japan had demanded the U.S. military hand over Major Michael J. Brown, 39, who police allege tried to rape the woman in her car on November 2.

Japanese police have declined to give details about the woman, but Kyodo news agency said she was from the Philippines.

"We have informed the government of Japan in a December 5 meeting of the U.S.-Japan joint committee that the government of the United States is unable to agree to transfer custody in this case prior to indictment," the U.S. embassy in Tokyo said.

RESENTMENT RUNS DEEP

"The government of the United States has concluded that the circumstances of this case as presented by the government of Japan do not warrant departure from the standard practice as agreed between the United States and Japan," it added.

Under the Status of Forces Agreement governing the conduct of the U.S. military in Japan, the United States need not hand over suspects until they are charged by Japanese prosecutors, except in the case of "heinous crimes" such as rape and murder.

Residents of Okinawa have long resented what they see as their unfair burden in hosting 26,000 of the 48,000 U.S. military personnel in the country as part of the U.S.-Japan security alliance, a pillar of Tokyo's postwar foreign policy.

Incidents involving the U.S. military, including the notorious 1995 rape of a 12-year-old Japanese girl by three servicemen, have fanned the resentment and prompted calls to shift the troops elsewhere in Japan or reduce their number, which the central government -- anxious to avoid ruffling bilateral ties -- is in general keen to avoid.

In March this year, U.S. airman Timothy Woodland was found guilty of raping a Japanese woman in June 2001 and sentenced to 32 months in a Japanese jail.

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Originally posted by dnice35

what did I do?

You know full well what you said denice. How would you feel if that was your sister or daughter?

Sassa is right!

That sick perverted idiot ought to be turned into to Japanese authorities.

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Originally posted by dnice35

Why should we hand him over? I am pretty sure she wanted it....

I think a coment similar to this got me banned from my favorite spot... I imagine you guys dont find any humor in it? confused:

What makes you so sure she really wanted it? Wether it was premiscous or not it is still rape and YES they SHOULD turn him over for that reason!! The uniform does not make him exempt for the crime he committed.

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Originally posted by normalnoises

What makes you so sure she really wanted it? Wether it was premiscous or not it is still rape and YES they SHOULD turn him over for that reason!! The uniform does not make him exempt for the crime he committed.

He should be tried here in the states!

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As part of our agreement w/ Japan (when we rebuilt their nation from ashes), was that our servicemen would be tried by our laws. This is to protect the Americans that are there to help that nations, when local laws are a bit nutz. Like the stoning that still goes on in backwards nations like Saudi Arabia. If we are going to put our American recourses in remote parts of the world we need to guarantee fair trials. Now, the Korea incident where the guys were in a traffic accident and got off is a great example of why we need to do this. Those boys might have spent their lives in jail because of a traffic accident.

Now, this guy, if he did try to rape someone, needs to sit in jail. An American jail and after we look into it!

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Originally posted by guyman1966

As part of our agreement w/ Japan (when we rebuilt their nation from ashes), was that our servicemen would be tried by our laws. This is to protect the Americans that are there to help that nations, when local laws are a bit nutz. Like the stoning that still goes on in backwards nations like Saudi Arabia. If we are going to put our American recourses in remote parts of the world we need to guarantee fair trials. Now, the Korea incident where the guys were in a traffic accident and got off is a great example of why we need to do this. Those boys might have spent their lives in jail because of a traffic accident.

Now, this guy, if he did try to rape someone, needs to sit in jail. An American jail and after we look into it!

this is bullshit!!!! if you commit a crime in another country, you should be subjected to their laws, otherwise don't go to that fucking country. i love how americans always try to justify these stupid, egotistical decisions they make to keep their own boys out of hot water, but when another foreign national does something here or elsewhere, GOD FORBID they don't get tried. just the same in the ICC situation, what is wrong with having a world court to try people guilty of horrendous crimes? the problem is that if the US says it would support it, hundreds, if not thousands of american pricks who are guilty of bad things (kissinger, bush, etc) would be put on trial= not good for the US in the long run.

politics stink...they really do....this country will see its downfall soon enough...no empire has ever survived for too long....

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i agree...you go to a country and you are bound by their laws...i would not agree that the us is an empire that is about to fall....we meddle in other peoples affairs but do not participate in colonization or control anything outside our borders...

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