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Guest shannon_coolj.

All edm lovers, check it --

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Guest shannon_coolj.

This web site is the FUTURE of edm and is so much better than online record stores.

http://www.edmdigital.com

You buy a record at a regular record store, you're spending $8-$11 (and you probably won't even like one of the remixes on there).

With this web site, you're in control -- you can download by track for $1.50 (low quality) and add .50 for high quality. Plus, most of the selections are amazing!

You can't beat that!

This site is young, but since February, I think they've had more than 250,000 downloads....if you go on and support them, they'll be able to add more tracks and more well-known artists.

Support the future, guys....

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Guest shannon_coolj.

oops -

yeah, i think you're right...

i think this site will get really big ...

but for now, it's still underground...not many people know about it (well, until i posted) ;)

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Guest endymion

Shannon, this is a pretty neat idea, thanks for pointing it out.

From the point of view of a guy who just spent six months working on an online music retailer, I would like to point out that this site will likely stay very underground forever.

The problem is that the combination of very high quality tracks and zero DRM is going to mean that most of the more business-oriented labels are not going to want their music on that store. When you design and build an online music business you have to set it up so that the guy with the job of going out and soliciting music from labels has an easy job. The people running this site are going to have a very hard time getting, say, a Sasha remix for this store.

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Shannon, this is a pretty neat idea, thanks for pointing it out.

From the point of view of a guy who just spent six months working on an online music retailer, I would like to point out that this site will likely stay very underground forever.

The problem is that the combination of very high quality tracks and zero DRM is going to mean that most of the more business-oriented labels are not going to want their music on that store. When you design and build an online music business you have to set it up so that the guy with the job of going out and soliciting music from labels has an easy job. The people running this site are going to have a very hard time getting, say, a Sasha remix for this store.

scrooge.

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Guest shannon_coolj.

Shannon, this is a pretty neat idea, thanks for pointing it out.

From the point of view of a guy who just spent six months working on an online music retailer, I would like to point out that this site will likely stay very underground forever.

The problem is that the combination of very high quality tracks and zero DRM is going to mean that most of the more business-oriented labels are not going to want their music on that store. When you design and build an online music business you have to set it up so that the guy with the job of going out and soliciting music from labels has an easy job. The people running this site are going to have a very hard time getting, say, a Sasha remix for this store.

ryan, i'm about to throw a british easter egg at you.

;)

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Guest endymion

scrooge.

Wouldn't that be a Grinch?

I'm sorry, I really didn't mean it that way... I do like the sliding quality scale thing. One of my favorite net radio stations, Boombastic Radio uses kind of a sliding pay scale. The 64kbps stream is free and you can pay for higher quality.

I completely agree that this sort of thing is the future because there is a big push on the production side to produce tracks with more than two channels. You already have physical media like DVD-Audio discs with full surround that sell for more than the same album on CD. I paid $30 for a Norah Jones DVD-Audio disc to get the full-on jazz hall experience and it rocked, worth the money. There is no reason not to do this with online music retail also.

I would expect that the first to make big bucks on a sliding quality scale will be iTunes, but they are not the only DRM out there. If there were a cheap DRM option for indie labels and retailers then a sliding scale site like that could explode.

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site sucks. I couldn't find any thing I was looking for...

ps, the music biz is one wacky biz.. They will fuck it up and never get it right, and evern apple doesn't make any money from itunes, they make it on the sale of thier ipods.

the future of music is bleak at best.

the BBboys cd is horrible, just another example of copy right laws killing inovation in the industry. The hottest house track right now is 100% illegal (take my picture) etc..

The clubs in NJ are getting beatened by joe schmo bars and nyc is not the old nyc. If you are a dj/producer, I'd get involved in a new industry or other revenue streams, because you can't make it as a dj any more in the US.

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Guest shannon_coolj.

saleen,

you can't find anything on that site cause they only sell underground music (good underground music, at that)...

you don't like that kind of stuff

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saleen,

you can't find anything on that site cause they only sell underground music (good underground music, at that)...

you don't like that kind of stuff

sweetie, I have a hard drive, that most djs would love to get their hands on. I have thousands of songs dating back to the early 90's, and I have sets that I haven't even listened to yet.

I just counted 22, 2 hour sets by JR V alone. (44 hours worth) I know undreground music, and that site, doesn't have any of the good stuff. You assume what I listen to to not be underground, back the fact remains THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS UNDERGROUND.

There is songs that are popular, and songs that are not, but certainly nothing is underground these days. To say it is, is to hold on to the past and try and think it's the year 1993, but in reality EDM as we know it, is over, completely.

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Guest shannon_coolj.

there is still an underground (and always will be). the definitions might shift through the years, but there will always be one.

just not in miami or ft. lauderdale...

and i think there are a lot of good tracks on that site!

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Guest endymion

Saleen is 100% right about the revenue trends in the music industry. Fans of underground music should be happy because fewer and fewer people producing music will be motivated by greed. The overall trend will be that more music will be produced by bigger numbers of people who are doing it just for the love of music.

Of course now these people also need to know how to do PR or write software or market a pharmacy or something so that they will be able to pay the rent. Much harder to be a full-time musician now that every monkey in the world is running around with a copy of Acid Pro.

And Saleen, Apple's long-term plan is to commoditize the content. They don't tie any measure of long-term success to the profitability of music sales, they see long-term success as the overal devaluation of the music itself. Choking off the RIAA's lobbying budget is the only way to win, and you do that by making good music cheap for everybody so that people send less money to the major labels. That's why iTunes is one of the only Apple apps available for Windows. Apple declared open warfare on the RIAA with the "Rip. Mix. Burn." campaign and they meant it.

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Saleen is 100% right about the revenue trends in the music industry. Fans of underground music should be happy because fewer and fewer people producing music will be motivated by greed. The overall trend will be that more music will be produced by bigger numbers of people who are doing it just for the love of music.

Of course now these people also need to know how to do PR or write software or market a pharmacy or something so that they will be able to pay the rent. Much harder to be a full-time musician now that every monkey in the world is running around with a copy of Acid Pro.

And Saleen, Apple's long-term plan is to commoditize the content. They don't tie any measure of long-term success to the profitability of music sales, they see long-term success as the overal devaluation of the music itself. Choking off the RIAA's lobbying budget is the only way to win, and you do that by making good music cheap for everybody so that people send less money to the major labels. That's why iTunes is one of the only Apple apps available for Windows. Apple declared open warfare on the RIAA with the "Rip. Mix. Burn." campaign and they meant it.

once the beatles go live online, then every artist will make the jump to itunes. Steve Jobs sez, he doesn't make any money off itunes, which launched in germany, france and the UK last week. But your comment about the app for windows was one they didn't want to do, but had to. The idea was for peeps to buy macs to use itunes and the ipod. Now ipod has it's own division at the company, and is not marketing along with their computers.

the good about itunes is the indie artists. they are doing well.

but the major underlying problem with music, is the music it self, not the medium in which we get it. There is a lack of quality bands, and no identity.

70s were rock and disco

80's rap and big hair bands

90's grunge, alternative rock and hip hop

2000's ?????? just more hip hop, but really it's cheesy pop rap.

fashion and music use to go hand and hand, now it doesn't.

from MJ's glove to Lisa Lisa's hair, to karl kani jeans. Modern hip hop is going to have a backlash soon. When it does, whats next?

Thus why from house to rock, I'm all about classics.

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there is still an underground (and always will be). the definitions might shift through the years, but there will always be one.

just not in miami or ft. lauderdale...

and i think there are a lot of good tracks on that site!

i'm sure there is some, but they can't and won't any money off of it... but its good to see styrke on there.

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Guest endymion

Modern hip hop is going to have a backlash soon. When it does, whats next?

Hip hop is adopting more and more world music. That's where I see that going. Reggae, ragga, reggaeton, samba, stuff from all over. The urban and Latin markets are moving closer together. You can go a LONG way with that model and keep the music interesting for a very long time.

And yeah, of course Windows iTunes is also marketing for iPods, Aqua, Macs, and Apple in general. That's the real product for Apple, that's what they sell. Not music. Music is just the stuff that you have to feed into the toys to make them interesting, like Pez to a Pez dispenser. Pez and Apple both want to commoditize the candy but make the dispenser market profitable. Apple needs to put a dent in the RIAA's ability to lobby in order to make "digital media hubs" realistic in the long term for people who are not geeks like me. Apple can't let the RIAA lobby to get each of Apple's new innovations outlawed.

The iPod, BTW, is a counter-attack against the RIAA stranglehold on FM radio and web radio licensing. Portable digital music hubs eliminate performance royalties from the equation and democratize music selection by making it each individual person's problem instead of a Clear Channel DJ.

These are not conspiracy theories, Apple has been very clear and open about their intentions to their shareholders and everybody else. Yes I am an Apple cheerleader.

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Modern hip hop is going to have a backlash soon. When it does, whats next?

Hip hop is adopting more and more world music. That's where I see that going. Reggae, ragga, reggaeton, samba, stuff from all over. The urban and Latin markets are moving closer together. You can go a LONG way with that model and keep the music interesting for a very long time.

not interesting here in america, which is the only market that counts in the world. The goverment of the UK didn't commisssion a probe into why last year there were no top 40 uk hits in the USA for nothing. The American cusomer has the purchasing power to make a break a genre or artist. Americans don't play second fiddle to foreign artists, just like the latin invasion which was wrongly credited to Ricky martin, when it should have been to the freestyle guys from nyc back in the late 80's and early 90's, it was a fad, no real progress, and now those latin artists can't get a gig here in the us outside miami.

I see a huge greastest hits and back on tour out of retirement scene comming to the fore front, but yet, a report on cnn.com said concerts are tanking left and right.

music is in trouble, big time.

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Guest endymion

not interesting here in america, which is the only market that counts in the world.

Hip hop is the biggest segment of 'the only market that counts in the world'. If you would listen to some of it then you would hear the world beats moving in.

It's happening in EDM too, like it or not. Adopting diverse world sounds is a natural effect of the democratization of music production. Three tracks I remember from last night's club adventures: a house track full of a rich organic American blues harmonica at Cafeteria, the lusciously Latin "Lei Lo Lei" in Marques Wyatt's living room at State, and Armand van Helden dropped the coolest Brasilian drum line at Crobar. Just walking around Miami, even in the narrow realm of dance-music-only rooms, is like a tour of the world. Diversity is cool, don't fight it.

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Guest shannon_coolj.

wha??

edm has been adopting "world sounds" for as long as i can remember...

it's already happened

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Guest endymion

edm has been adopting "world sounds" for as long as i can remember...

Sure, cause EDM was one of the first genres to use a lot of sampling.

Like, oh, say, hip hop and the overall mainstream American music industry now. Hip hop producers are only going to use beats that were born and raised in the USA? Why, that doesn't make sense? US copyright holders coming down hard on each other for sampling is perpetuating the trend to look outside of the American music industry for source material. It's actually preferable at this point to use some foreign nobody's sitar music or a bongo drum than to 'keep it in the family' and use American music.

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