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Guest saleen351

did anyone read this article on cd recording??????

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Guest saleen351

I pulled this article off a site, is this new or old, and what do u think of it...

Anti-piracy system could damage loudspeakers

Here we go again:

"...CD pirates beware - the music industry has a new weapon up its sleeve. It is called the Cactus

Data Shield, and it is designed to add noisy garbage to all copied CDs. The trouble is, it could also damage the hi-fi and loudspeakers of people who play pirated CDs.Sony is already evaluating the Cactus system through its music division, which has been secretly testing it in Eastern Europe. The system was developed by Midbar Tech, a company based in TelAviv. Midbar Tech refuses to comment on how its system works, but New Scientist has dug out its American patent (US 6208598) - which reveals all. Midbar's anti-piracy technology follows on the heels of a similar system from Macrovision of California, which recently launched its SafeAudio system. This adds uncorrectable errors to the digital music on a CD, so CD writers on PCs can't copy it. But Macrovision admits SafeAudio doesn't work with consumer disc-to-disc CD copiers. However, Eyal Shavit of Midbar Tech claims, "We can stop all nds of copying, even on domestic CD recorders." Midbar's patent points out that all music CDs store bursts of music code and control

information. The music data is marked with "flags" which tell the CD player to decode it and send it to the amplifier and loudspeakers. The control information is not decoded. When burning the original CD, Midbar's idea is to replace some of the music with false data and label it as control information.While CD players do not decode this, they are designed to disguise the gap by bridging it withguessed data. So the original CD plays acceptably, according to Midbar. "There is little or no net difference in audio quality," it claims in its patent, though the company will

not identify the "golden-eared" listeners who have tested the system. If the CD is copied, however,

the copier machine (a PC or disc-to-disc copier) sees the fake control data as music. So when the

copied disc is played, there are bursts of distortion as the player tries in vain to decode thegarbage. It not only sounds bad, says Midbar, but it is "potentially damaging" to the player's

circuitry if the added noise has a suitable wave shape. It is well known in the audio industry that feeding large "square wave" pulses to sensitive circuitry - particularly loudspeakers - can cause damage because high-frequency harmonics in the steeply rising and trailing edges cause rapidly repeating high-energy peaks in the speaker output. Sony hassecretly tested Cactus by treating several thousand CDs sold recently in the Czech Republic andSlovakia, but the system was not set to cause damage on this occasion. "We have had no problems

with loudspeakers," Shavit says. While acknowledging that it may seem "unacceptable" to harmconsumers' equipment deliberately, he adds, "It's 'sweat engineering'. We can add extra lines of defence as people use new attacks." Midbar will not identify the affected CD titles sold in EasternEurope, so no independent listening tests are possible...

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It sounds legit. My question is how are they going to stop us from Ripping tracks and thus removing all the garbage they added by encoding? Guess we will just have to wait till some of us pick up a few of these encoded CDs.

-Guy

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Guest saleen351
Originally posted by aguy2go

It sounds legit. My question is how are they going to stop us from Ripping tracks and thus removing all the garbage they added by encoding? Guess we will just have to wait till some of us pick up a few of these encoded CDs.

-Guy

here is my pt, to the whole sit,

1. Satellite radio goes on the air in oct, will be an option on cadddys and we can buy the shit..So why can't I burn something off a sat radio program, if you got 1 for your car then why not your house

2. Ripping off of sat tv networks.

3 the ever popular ripping off the radio

4 white label mostly has copywrite probs so it is illegal to put it out anyway, soooo I doubt djs can use this for illegal stuff...

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Doesnt matter what new shit companies come out with there will always be people smarter who will rip the shit out of it. They are trying so much shit now its riduculous. There will always be Hackers, crackers etc. Pirating shit to stop the greedy Fucking label companies. There is always a way around copying shit just a matter of time till someone finds out how to do it. Besides I doubt they will ever throw this shit out. E.G Lets say I pick up a cd from a friend how am I supposed to know its ripped and I throw it on my system, what stop the innocent people from getting their systems ruined :). Just my 2 cents

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heres another article

1 million copy-protected CDs released

By Gwendolyn Mariano

Staff Writer, CNET News.com

August 8, 2001, 4:35 p.m. PT

Israeli security company Midbar said Wednesday that it released 1 million copy-protected CDs in the European market and plans are in discussion for entry in the U.S. market.

Midbar said the CDs are protected by its technology, dubbed Cactus Data Shield, which prevents potential copyright pirates from illegally reproducing the content.

The company said its CDs can play on all types of machines without any alterations to the quality of the recording or the abilities of the playback machinery itself.

The announcement is the latest sign that companies are pushing forward with copy-protection schemes even though attempts to date have proven to be difficult. Last year, Midbar worked with BMG Germany to test secure CDs. The effort failed, however, and the company abandoned the project after finding that the CDs could not play on many ordinary CD players.

BMG Entertainment has higher hopes. Last month the company said it will work with security technology provider SunnComm to create copy-protected CDs. BMG is also testing technologies from Midbar, Macrovision and a handful of other companies. In addition, for the last several months, Macrovision has been quietly testing copy-protected CDs on unwitting consumers to ensure unbiased feedback, according to the company.

"I'm very skeptical that (copy-protected CDs) will work," said Aram Sinnreich, an analyst with Jupiter Research. "In terms of implementation, it's very difficult to do in a way that will allow the CD to play on all devices...it's a very tetchy technology."

A huge installed base of CD players out there are not security-enabled, Sinnreich said, so it would be difficult to find engineering solutions that would fit all those machines.

Midbar, however, said it is continuing to upgrade and renew its technology.

"The industry has made a decision, opting to utilize technology to combat this problem," Ran Alcalay, chief executive of Midbar, said in a statement. "We are focused on achieving the highest level of both security and playability without compromising one at the expense of the other."

Sinnreich said that even if the copy-protected CDs do work, companies will need to offer something to consumers to compensate for not letting them copy songs. He said that as soon as there are a significant number of products on the market that don't allow consumers to rip or listen to CDs on any machine "there's going to be a critical mass of consumer pushback against this."

"Historically, when an industry is trying to move from one format to another, the successful way to do it is not to remove value from an old format, but rather to add value to a new format," Sinnreich said. "You've got to give something to get something."

:laugh: :laugh:

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A couple weeks ago I tried burning a Collective Soul CD (Dosage) and when I listened to the burned copy, the tracks were all cut in the wrong places, like, in the middle of the songs. So instead of each track number starting in the beginning of the song, it starts in the middle. Is this cuz i screwed it up when copying it? or do they now have some kind of way to prevent people from burning cds by making the reproduced ones all screwed up.

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Just to clear some things up, I have done some Research in this, and that cactus Bullshit will not Fuck with any of your systems, Ill explain why,

If u Currently have a Burner, DO NOT Get rid of it, OUr BUrners Will BURn any type of cD out in the market, the fact that there is certain protection rights on CD's DOES NOT MEAN u cant copy it, A thread before this a kid said that He had trouble Copying a song And it when it copied , IT played all the songs at half, THE NUMBER ONE PROTECTON ( Copyright ) the INdustry users use, is known as Fault Protectection ( Ignore bad sectors )

BAd sectors Are Placed inside Certain CD's on purpose inorder to Fuck up your Copying, Like if ur Copying a CD and it has this protection, then there is a 4 or 5 bytes Telling the CDR when it Burning that the Data is curropt, thus it makes you Get an Error While ur Copying, however There are some SERIOUS Burning Tools that Give u the option of Ignoring this, NOW if u dont have GOOD Software ( UR FUCKED ) because u cant use garbage like adaptec Ez cd creator ( there is nothing EZ about it) and there is ALWAYS ALWAYS third party Recorders ( if worst comes to worst )

u can use the wonderful Soundblaster Features ( i believe its Sounbladster Recorder and it Lets you Record "What u hear " from a digital plugin, CD , wav , Etc... )

THEY WILL NEVER STOP US HAHAHAHHAHAHA

:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

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